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launched by the u.s. and other countries. president obama again making the case for why the u.s. went in, but how does it end? >>> in japan, the disaster deepens with new problems at the nuclear plant. there are new fears about food safety and an american family has received the worst possible news about their daughter. our teams are on the ground. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. in addition to two wars on two other fronts, the united states military tonight is engaged against libya. the attacks are in the form of air strikes. 32 of them in just the last 24 hours. about half now being carried out by u.s. aircraft. and there have been 136 cruise missiles launched. only eight of them by british armed forces. the rest launched by the u.s. they have hit targets up and down the libyan coastline, mostly aimed at libyan defenses, so the coalition aircraft can begin enforcing that no-fly zone over a larger portion of the country. the united states says moammar gadhafi is not a target personally, but president obama says the u.s. acted in
command will likely look like when the u.s. transitions to what will be essentially a nato, plus arab countries. h isep model used in afghanistan as it's described to me. we understand the u.s. and france have come to a late agree in the the last few hours there is now no discrepancy between what france wants and what the u.s. wants. the president we understand is culting short his visit to latin america. he plans to transition. i'm told we can expect a transition of command by this time next week. the headquarters likely to be at a nato headquarters in naples, italy. the f-15 fighter jet went down at 11:33 monday evening local time according to u.s. marine officials. the two airmen ejected safely after an apparent malfunction of the jet. other pilots in the air at the time say they did not see enemy fire. seven u.s. military aircraft were launched from their bases in the mediterranean to take part in the recovery. two u.s. carrier jets flew cover for the mission and defense officials confirmed dropped two bomb to separate the pilot from suspected enemy approach. the downed pilot was
for the link in the hot topics bar near the top of the home page. >>> in libya tonight, u.s. fighter pilots are enforcing a no-fly zone over libya after a barrage of allied missiles struck anti-aircraft defenses but there are big questions moving forward about how long and how far the u.s. will go as it involves itself in a war. tom fitzgerald in the news room now and the president sought to answer a few of the questions today. >> he did, brian. and the president is in chile tonight as he continues his trip in latin america. in a news conference this afternoon, president obama said moving forward, the u.s. is going to take on a diminished role in this operation but clearly tonight the u.s. military is in the lead in libya. u.s. military officials say so far the no-fly zone is proving successful. as two days of attacks by the u.s. and allies, gadhafi has been unable to launch new air attacks against other forces. >> we have spent considerable effort to degrade libya's machines military command and control capability. >> reporter: the no-fly zone is in place other northern libya. the goal is
to make the case for u.s. involvement,. this comes as libyan rebels resume their offensive. they advanced 350 miles this weekend and retook two key oil towns. military missions are mostly completed according to u.s. officials. >> we prevented the large-scale slaughter that was beginning to take place and has taken place in some places. >> on one hand they say it's humanitarian and on the other they say gaddafi must go. >> defense secretary gates and secretary of state clinton will be brief congress on the u.s. mission in libya and the cost. the president will speak tonight at 7:00 -- 7:30 on abc 7 news. >>> monday. the crisis at the crippled nuclear power plant may be getting worse. japanese officials say highly radioactive iodine is seeping from the facility. contaminated sea water is being found farther from the plant. they are pumping hundreds of tons of radioactive water. now the plant operators are apologizing for overstating radio -- radiation levels inside the reactors. >>> 32 years ago today the u.s. suffered its worst nuclear crisis, three mile island nuclear plant in pennsylvani
after soaring radiation forces a retreat. and the u.s. tells americans to evacuate a 50-mile danger zone. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the question everyone in this country is asking: could it happen here? the u.s. has 23 nuclear reactors just like those in japan. how safe are they and we? and as the search goes on for victims of the earthquake and tsunami, an american exchange teacher is among the missing. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. they have what could be the most dangerous job in the world, and the world is rooting for them to get it done. the nuclear power plant workers in japan trying to prevent a meltdown. radiation at the dai-ichi plant in fukushima got so high today they were forced to leave temporarily, but now they're back on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be
of the u.s. military? we'll get an update from the region and talk with two of the senate's most influencial voices on foreign policy, john mccain and joe lieberman. and healthcare reform one year later. we will ask our sunday group what is the long-term prognosis for the president's signature legislation. all, right now on "fox news sunday." and hello again from fox news in washington. before we talk with our guests, we want to bring you the latest on events in the middle east. in syria, government soldiers have been deployed around the cities that have seen the biggest protests. in yemen, talks for a peaceful transfer of power failed saturday. now, authorities worry about al-qaeda gaining strength in that country. and in libya, bombing by u.s. and allied planes has paveed the way for rebel forces to retake the key oil town. for more on libya let's bring in fox news correspondent steve harrigan in tripoli. >> a rapid advance for the rebels. moving quickly toward what they say is an eventual battle here in tripoli. they have taken the key town of ajdabiya. the air strikes have ta
-made guns across the border and for the unrelenting demand of illegal drugs in the u.s. the two countries are also at odds after a wikileaks release quoting u.s. officials quoting mexican's security agencies "corrupt and dysfunctional." publicly, the obama administration is putting a positive spin on the relationship. >> there exists an unprecedented level of cooperation between the u.s. and mexico. >> but when the two presidents go behind bars, tensions could rise over a recent interview in which president calderon called u.s. law enforcement agencies disorganized. and there will also be discussions about the growing number of americans caught in the cross fire of mexico's drug war, including u.s. immigration agent, jaime spatta, who was killed in an ambush along a highway 16 days ago. at his funeral last week, homeland department secretary, janet napolitano, promised to seek justice. >> we will not relent or let up or flinch in any way in our determination to see that those responsible for his death are held to account for their crimes. >> mexico is the u.s.'s largest trade partner, and
coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't reach the plant. however, having said that, the levels of radiation in tokyo have returned to normal. apparently the italian embassy found that levels of radiation were a fifth of what they were in r
will take charge? what role will the u.s. play and did the hundredth vote come too late to stop gadhafi? will gadhafi fight for the death or accept some kind of a deal? we'll try to answer those questions as we prepare to fingt third muslim count -- fight in m country. >>> japanese more or less admit they are overwhelmed. wow. they are ememploying it throw against the wall and see what sticks approach ahead of the u.s. nuclear commission says it could takes wakes to get this under control. score one for the unions in wisconsin. a judge has temporarily blocked that new law shrinking collective bargaining rights. democrats hope that's the first of many obstacles. republicans say it's a speed bump. libya. we know how we're getting in. how will we get out? we start with the growing cry slinsia. richard engel is joining us from cairo. thank you, richard. give us a sense of what's happening as the u.n. begins to take action. what is the condition of the rebel force, especially benghazi. >> reporter: the rebel force is very weak in benghazi and across the country. what happened was the rebels
and the crash of a u.s. military jet in the east. and we talk to libya's ambassador to the united states, ali suleiman aujali, who denounced moammar qaddafi last month. >> ifill: then, margaret warner looks at rifts within the nato alliance about the libya mission. >> brown: from japan, we get the latest on the cleanup in the hard-hit city of sendai. >> it might not seem much to you, but believe me it's a huge step that you now can actually drive up at the airport's departure terminal. >> ifill: and judy woodruff interviews japan's ambassador to the u.s., ichiro fujisaki. >> brown: special correspondent steve sapienza reports from bangladesh on the struggle to meet the basic needs of an exploding population. >> dahka is one of the world's fastest growing cities and one of the poorest. with 2,000 newcomers daily the struggle to find clean water in the slums often has life threatening consequences. >> ifill: and ray suarez examines what a merger between at&t and t-mobile would mean for consumers and the wireless industry. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshou
want to tell you about a gunman who opened fire on a bus carrying u.s. soldiers outside the frankfurt airport in germany. two people were killed. >> reporter: a sheet covers up the broken windshield of the bus carrying u.s. soldiers. the shooting happened at the airport in frankfurt, germany near several u.s. military bases. police say a gunman opened fire as the bus sat outside a terminal. two people were killed. the bus driver and a passenger. and two others were wounded. police took the gunman into custody. police could not confirm whether any of the casualties are u.s. military personnel. randall pinkston, cbs news. >>> a u.s. park police officer is being treated for injuries after a motorcycle accident on the southeast southwest tree way near 7th street southwest. the accident happened just before 11:00 this morning. right now there is no word on the severity of the officer's injuries. police are investigating exactly how that crash happened. >>> late this morning the supreme court ruled that the first amendment protects members of a controversial church would hold anti-gay from
of people in london. dozens of u.s. allies that at least one libyan opposition leader. she discussed the coalition's goals for ending the not war. >> to urge qaddafi to implement a real cease-fire that is not going to be immediately breached by his own forces. to withdraw from those areas that he has taken by force. and to look for a political resolution which could include his leaving the country. >> shepard: this comes as a senior u.s. officials tells fox news that qaddafi's inner circle shows signs of, quote, cracking with some of his most trusted advisors questioning whether he can survive. that official also tells us that morale among the libyan troops is low. but the situation on the ground in the not war does not reflect that over the past 24 hours, colonel qaddafi's forces have made significant gains against the rebel fighters. those rebels advanced quickly over the last couple days qaddafi's hometown of sirte. rockets forced them to double back today, retreat. this despite the coalition firing 22 tomahawk missiles at a cost of $33 million. and flying more than 100 air strike
's ambassador to the u.s., ichiro fujisaki. >> brown: special correspondent steve sapienza reports from bangladesh on the struggle to meet the basic needs of an exploding population. >> dahka is one of the world's fastest growing cities and one of the poorest. with 2,000 newcomers daily the struggle to find clean water in the slums often has life threatening consequences. >> ifill: and ray suarez examines what a merger between at&t and t-mobile would mean for consumers and the wireless industry. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy and improve schools. >> and our communities. >> in angola chevron helps train engineers, teachers and farmers, launch child's programs. it's not just good business. >> i'm hopeful about my country's future. >> it's my country's future. >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds great cars. ouan yd'lt fi y indin the people at toyota, al
with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be exposed to are potentially lethal in a short period of time. it's nearly six days now since the earthquake and tsunami killed at least 4300 people and damaged the nuclear reactors. today, u.s. officials told americans within 50 miles of the plant to evacuate the area or stay indoors. that is two and a half times as wide as the danger zone established by the japanese. harry smith begins tonight's coverage of the disaster in japan. >> reporter: in a sign of how grave japan's crisis has become, the emperor, akihito, made an unprecedented television address, acknowledging that he is deeply worried, urging his subjects not to give up. it did little to calm a country increasingly distrustful, given the wave of conflicting reports and mixed messages. >> ( translated ): there is both positive and negative news. i don't know which i should believe. >> reporter: and today on capitol hill, u.s. energy secretary and nuclear expert steven chu said he, too, is baffled. >> and ther
. >>> contamination concerns. dangerous levels of radiation are found in tokyo's water supply, as the u.s. bans the import of some japanese foods. >> right there. right there! >> and too close for comfort. a kayaker in florida meets a >> and too close for comfort. a kayaker in florida meets a monster of the deep. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody. thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. we will not surrender. those words, the defiant libyan leader moammar gadhafi, who made his first public appearance in a week. despite the allied-imposed no-fly zone, libyan troops continued their unrelenting attacks against rebel-held cities where conditions are described as desperate. the u.s. military says it is considering all options. explosions were heard in tripoli this morning. and susan mcginnis is in washington with more on this story. good morning, susan. >> hi, good morning, betty. the mission in libya is accomplishing its goal, including grounding gadhafi's air force. but as criticism of the operation grows, along with the cost, the u.s. is looking to hand off control. despite a
? what role will the u.s. play? and did the u.n. vote come too late to stop gadhafi? will gadhafi fight for the death or accept some kind of deal. answer those questions as we prepare to fight in a third muslim country. and japanese authorities have raised the assessment of a nuclear disaster to a five -- that's three mile island level on a seven-point scale and they now more or less at mitt they're overwhelmed. they're employing a throw against the wall and see what sticks approach in the nuclear commission. it says it can take weeks to get this thing under control. score one for the unions in wisconsin. the judge has temporarily blocked the new law shrinking collective bargaining rights in that state. wow, democrats hope this is the first of many obstacles. republicans say, it's just a speed bump, check it out. let me finish with libya. we know how we're getting in. but do you have any idea how we're going to get out? we start on libya. richard engle is joining us from cairo. thank you, richard, give us a sense of what's happening as the u.n. begins to take action. what is the conditi
residents are dealing with a damaged left behind. >>> the u.s. formally handed over command of military operations in libya but today there are reports that cia operatives are on the ground there. pamela brown is following this for us and is alive in our satellite center. >> defense secretary robert gates said today that american involvement is winding down now that nato has taken over, but questions about the future of the country remain. rebels launched a series of rocket attacks on the frontlines between two key cities. they were beaten back by gaddafi forces. >> he has command and control communications, a lot of which the opposition does not have. >> abc sources said on wednesday president obama signed a secret presidential finding allowing cia operatives to provide support to the rebels in eastern libya. lawmakers in washington remain divided over america's engagement in libya. >> this is the most model definition of an operation probably in u.s. history. >> i think the president has been quite clear in terms of what the military mission is. and that's one of the reasons why we ca
the victim of a robbery. >>> president obama will make his case tonight about the u.s. role in libya. >> nato is ready to take the helm. the libyan rebels are on the offensive now. >> president obama plans to address the nation tonight about libya. expected to say that the u.s. acted quickly to avoid catastrophe. libyan rebels will say it made a difference. doubles the advanced 350 miles on the weekend. a march toward tripoli that includes the hometown of gaddafi. the rebels tried this before, but they were pushed back. now they have the backing of nato, which announced yesterday it is taking over coalition military operations. >> nato will command all aspects of the u.n. resolution. >> nato's increased role means the u.s. hand over of control. defense secretary gates says the military missions are to a large extent completed. >> we have prevented the large- scale slaughter that was beginning to take place and has taken place in some places. >> critics say the administration has given mixed messages. >> on one hand they say is humanitarian and on the other they say gaddafi must go. >> gaddafi
the details. obama >>> president the nation for the first the u.s. bombed libya to stop muammar gaddafi from attacking his own people. a failure to act would have a betrayal of who we are as he said., this speech comes amid criticism democrats and republicans. john has more on what is next for the white house. >> secretary of state hillary in london withet opposition and from 30 nations. failing to intervene in libya left the world watching and at the humanitarian disaster unfold. >> the people have been ruled by tyrant, muammar gaddafi. e has exploited their guelph, opponents at home and abroad and terrorize innocent people. >> it went on for a year in bosnia before the world responded. >> tonight we have stopped the deadly attacks. >> hours earlier rebels recaptured crucial territory. the president said he fulfilled promises and no ground troops. nato takes over on wednesday. >>for those who doubted our capacity to take care of this the u.s. has done said we would do. >> he pushed back who said the goal should go beyond the e of protecting civilians. >> broadening our missions include regi
leading the air assault on libyan air defense and assets on the ground, the u.s. will pull back and hand over command and control to someone. when? >> we anticipate this transition to take place in a matter of days and not a matter of weeks. >> reporter: the u.s. role will then shift to providing logistical support while the uk, france, italy and other countries enforce the no-fly zone. but no one will say how long that will last. >> i wouldn't speculate in terms of length at this particular point in time. >> reporter: after all, the no-fly zone over iraq ended from the end of gulf war i to the beginning of gulf war ii, 11 years. >>> there is now growing international disagreement over the u.s.-led attacks. norway with drew its planes because it was unsure about which country was in charge. meanwhile, russian prime minister vladimir putin railed against the air strikes as outside meddling, saying it is, quote, reminiscent of a medieval call for a crusade when someone called on others to go and liberate something. >>> and be sure to stay with abc news all day as we continue our c
. radiation levels prompting the u.s. military to consider mandatory evacuation of thousands of american troops and their families in japan. radioactive dust being detected at very low levels, we want to point out in seattle, washington. despite substantial progress over the weekend this is far from over. we're going to have the latest details at this hour, also the latest on the dead and missing now numbering 21,000. and the body of a young american teacher has been found. we talked about her on this show last week, her parents had been searching for her. she's the first known american fatality. we begin though with the attack on gadhafi forces in libya, now entering day four. allied forces launching as many as 80 missions today, that is up from yesterday. americans flying fewer than half of them, that is down from yesterday. according to mission commander, pro-gadhafi forces are mounting little resistance, nor is the opposition taking advantage of air strikes on pro-gadhafi missions. while grateful for the air support, they're having trouble getting organized and have little communicat
, however, as you noted, because even amid this crisis, the u.s. has had some contact with libyan officials and that has been critical in terms of helping to get americans and others out of the tripoli safely. so if you were to cut off all of those ties, that could put some of the remaining americans, obviously, in some jeopardy. why would the u.s. then take such a dramatic step and cut off all diplomatic ties? because that was a big deal for colonel gadhafi a few years ago when the george w. bush administration finally said he was no longer a rogue state, that they would recognize him diplomatally because he came forward with his weapons program. if all of a sudden the u.s. cut off all ties, that would he remove even more if there is a shred of legitimacy left for gadhafi and remove it once and for all. that would be the pressure point because that is something he has craved so long is have some legitimacy on the world stage. of course, given what ben is reporting and given what is happening on the ground right now, it's doubtful he has any legitimacy but the u.s. is looking for any lever
the president's plan. >>> fallout fears. the pentagon considers the mandatory evacuation of all u.s. military personnel threatened by radiation in japan as the first american victim of the tragedy is found. >>> and medical marvel. a texas man gets the first full facial transplant in the u.s. this is the "cbs morning news" facial transplant in the u.s. this is the "cbs morning news" for tuesday, march 22nd, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning and thanks for joining us. i'm betty nguyen. this morning allied forces are working to expand the no fly zone over libya. overnight tripoli was targeted for the third day in a row and there is growing discord among the allies and here in this country over the u.s. role. susan mcginnis is in washington with more. >> reporter: several days of attacks on libya are having their intended effect according to u.s. officials, even so, more in congress are questioning the president's decisions. anti-aircraft fire erupted in tripoli overnight as moammar gadhafi's forces battled a fresh round of air strikes. u.s. officials say days of attacks on the regi
shipped to el salvador today. he will deal with sensitive u.s. policy is used like immigration, narcotics, and gun trafficking. last night the president of chile hosted a dinner for the president and mrs. obama. mr. obama called for a new partnership between u.s. and latin america. >>> collisions strikes continue targeting gaddafi's forces in libya. u.s. military officials say the assault on libyan air defenses have been successful and that the no-fly zone will be extended. emily schmidt has been tracking the latest developments overnight and has the latest. >> good morning. moammar gaddafi has kept a low profile the past couple days, no signs of him amid all the signs of a no-fly zone expanding. this isn't the fourth day after three nights of coalition forces targeting libya. they have gained control of libyan airspace over the eastern part of the country. now the focus is expanding towards the capital of tripoli. the u.s. continues to say that gaddafi himself is not a target. president obama yesterday said that he has called for gaddafi to step down, but the military action is solely ai
the case for u.s. involvement. his speech comes as libyan rebels resume their offensive. they advanced 350 miles this past weekend and recaptured two key oil sounds. u.s. officials say militau.s. military actions are mostly over. >> i think we prevented the large-scale slaughter that was beginning to take place and has taken place in some places. >> on one hand they say it is humanitarian and on the other they say gaddafi must go. >> this weekend the defense secretary and the secretary of state will brief congress on the mission and its cost. president's speech is tonight at 7:30 on abc 7. >>> the crisis in japan at the nuclear power plant may be getting worse. officials say highly radioactive iodine is seeping from the facility and contaminated the water is being found farther from the plant now. the crews are pumping out hundreds of tons of radioactive water. the plant's operators are apologizing for overstating radiation levels inside the reactors. >>> 32 years ago today the u.s. suffered its worst nuclear crisis. that was at three mile island nuclear plant in pennsylvania. >> the disas
, and other u.s. officials and more pressure today from john mccain about what the military options might be. mccain now joining john kerry and others, calling for a no-fly zone and pushback from the pentagon, despite denials, i know, that the pentagon spokesman was on your show earlier at 9:00, saying that there has been no pushback. but certainly, what we've seen from secretary gates and the chairman of the joint chiefs, admiral mullen, is emphasizing all of the drawbacks to getting involved militarily there. chuck? >> well, you laid it out very well there, andrea. secretary gates yesterday, in referring to the no-fly -- the talk about the no-fly zone as loose talk certainly created the impression that there was somehow a little bit of a disconnect between the state department and the pentagon, about what is next, how serious is this idea for a no-fly done. so clearly, that's one of the questions that's going to be directed at the president later today. now, let's be careful, by the way, not to call this a press conference. they are only saying one question, for, quote, each side. >> one!
%. bill: the mounting nuclear concerns forcing the u.s. military to reposition some ships and aircraft away from the east coast of japan. the u.s.s. ronald reagan now pulling back from the fukushima plant after low levels of radioactivity were found in the air. 17 air crew members who returned from a relief mission were said to have been exposed to low levels of radioactive activity. they were treated but they have not had any reaction. >> reporter: following the disaster in japan some say it's still a viable and vital source of energy in the u.s., but connecticut senator joe lieberman says it's time to put a brake on nuclear power. >> put the brakes on it until we understand the ramifications of what's happened in japan. we have 104 nuclear power plants in america now. 23 of them are built according to designs that are similar to the nuclear power plants in japan that are now the focus of our concern. >> reporter: senator lieberman says he still supports the development of nuclear power, but the u.s. should take another look at its domestic policy. bill: the facts on the fukushima nuc
of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission said told the water is gone from that pool -- today the water is gone from that pool. if that is true, it means there would be nothing to stop a potential meltdown, but the japanese tonight deny that. as for the survivors, the earthquake and tsunami has ripped away life as they knew it. hundreds of thousands of people are crammed into makeshift shelters across japan and all the while still dealing with almost hourly aftershocks, freezing cold temperatures outside and food rationing. the infrastructure roads where cars once drove are now cracked and buckled. major supply lines are disrupted and with the country's nuclear power plants in peril electricity is in short supply making it harder to deliver even the very basics to those in desperate need. people are waiting in long lines. they're about 1/2-mile long in some cases just to get their hands on those basic needs. >> translator: i don't have gas. i don't have kerosene for heat. i don't have electricity. i don't have anything at all in my home. to survive all i can do is wait no matter how lo
that was run by the u.s. will be commanded by nato, an obama diplomatic win. but many in congress warn president obama not to send u.s. ground troops to depose gadhafi, who is said to be in this car today. >> yes, we want him out. no, we don't want to do it at the enormous cost of military invasion. >> reporter: the president has to justify taking sides in what some see as a civil war. >> will america's commitment & end in days, not weeks, as the president promised? >> reporter: defense secretary gates admitted on "meet the press," libya is not vital. >> no, i don't think it's vital interests for the united states, but we clearly have interests there, and it's a part of the recently, which is a vital interest for the united states. >> reporter: a region in chaos, uprisings in egypt, syria, bahrain, jordan, might the president commit the u.s. military elsewhere. libya's already cost about $1 billion. with no clear end in sight. >>> tonight, some u.s. naviville vessels are reported to be pulling out of the mediterranean. tomorrow, u.s. allies meet about libya. the plan is to put pressure
safe. thank you. in the u.s., the americans are mobilizing to help the strongest asian ally. james rose season at the state department. >> i want to reiterate america's support for people in japan. i said directly to the prime minister of japan, prime minister kan that the united states will continue to offer any assistance we can as japan recovers from multiple disasters. >> already that assistance spans the full range of the u.s. government asset and capabilities. officials from the department of energy and the nuclear regulatory commission are working on site with the japanese counterparts. >> in particular, they have asked for additional types of equipment that will help provide water in other re sources to ensure that the reactors continue to be cool. >> we have dispatched suggest matter experts. both reactor experts and expert on emergency response. >> the u.s. agency for international development has spent nearly $750,000 on japanese relief efforts. u.s. aid rushed to the quake zone a team that includes officials from the department of health and human services. also on site are
. it is a u.s.-led effort to help the rebels in eastern libya. nato has agreed to command a no- fly zone, but who will run the air attack? it remains undetermined. >> it could fall under nato. it is a political decision that is ongoing. >> u.s. forces would have the major role just to lower -- just a lower public profile. >> remember the scene and "wizard of oz"? >> leading democratic senator jay rockefeller said, i want to avoid getting into another conflict with on down costs and consequences. the white house said the president had to get into libya before congress could debate. >> there is very little doubt that benghazi would have fallen and many people would have died. >> meanwhile, a massive protest today in syria, a nation next to israel. in jordan today, the most violent demonstration so far. critical mideast states in turmoil with u.s. forces in action, far to the west. it looks like no quick -- officials are planning for a three-month operation over libya. >> you will find the latest developments on efforts to drive the libyan leader out of power on our website. you can take pa
values. he argued last night that the u.s.-led coalition helped to avert a massacre that would have "stained the contents of the world." the alliance against gaddafi has made significant gains. rebels have recaptured nearly all the ground they lost and are closing in on the home town of gaddafi. the president emphasized that these gains have come at a relatively low-cost. the u.s. has not gone into this along. so the progress has come without u.s. ground troops and with a full transfer of power to nato tomorrow. the president stopped short of supporting a forceful removal of adopted, which has become a point of contention with republicans. >> now we are fighting on the side of the anti-gaddafi rebels. we are paving the way for them. we should acknowledge that. >> the president has found himself all along caught between those saying that he has not done enough and those that have said he has done too much. hillary clinton is in london today with international leaders to explore other options such as financial. >>> the situation at the crippled japanese nuclear power plant is being de
's very important to understand what general madis said today. what he said, that is if the u.s. decided to enforce a no-fly zone it would, first, involve u.s. military air strikes against targets inside libya. you'd have to bomb the runways. you might take out their aircraft or certainly their air defense systems, missiles, radar, and the like. so it would involve a u.s. military attack on libya itself. and if the white house makes that decision, of course, the u.s. military would carry it out. but i can tell you that there's a lot of hesitation, not only here in the building and among the u.s. military to take that kind of aggressive step, but even among the nato allies who would be essential if the u.s. and nato allies were to launch any kind of operation like this, and so far only the british are doing any kind of saber rattling in that regard. and the rest of nato nations, allies, are pretty much silent whether to launch any military operation against libya. >> give is insight on the three military war ships in the suez canal. what is their role, at this point? >> reporter: their ro
of course sending a massive amount of aid and the u.s. military. the u.s.s. ronald reagan, the carrier strike group has an aircraft carrier and a number of united states ships there assisting in the rescue efforts as well as using-- we saw this in hurricane katrina, of course, the military and coast card using the massive ships as basically floating hospitals where they have fresh water and dave you pointed out earlier, the des desalization process. >> and that's vital and 70 countries offered aid including china which is interesting because they've been very contentious for years and years, especially in the last couple, over an incident that international waters in japan, and we won't get into the particulars, however, china came to their aid and offered condolences, offered money and as we've pointed out, the united states appears to be leading the way and we're supposed to check in with the 7th fleet of the navy later on this morning what they're doing to help. >> alisyn: you can see already, food ap supplies are distributed by our military and meanwhile, satellite photos are just
the no- fly zone. u.s. and coalition fighter jets. at least another dozen cruise missiles. the mission is to keep moammar gadhafi's fighters from fighting. >> reporter: coalition planes are working to extend the no- fly zone. and the u.s. army general in charge says the strategy is working. >> we are so far achieving our military objectives, consistent with our mission. >> reporter: coalition forces are keeping up the assault on moammar gadhafi's offenses. they launched at least 12 more missile attacks monday, after a weekend of fighting. they even fired a missile at part of gadhafi's presidential compound. u.s. officials say he was using the building as a command center. >> and there is also a command facility that we are certain is a command and control facility. and that is the facility that was attacked. >> reporter: the goal of the mission is to take away gadhafi's ability to attack civilians and to establish a no- fly zone, while americans are leading the operations now, the u.s. is eager to hand over control to other nations. >> we anticipate this transition to take place in a m
and the u.s. role is winding down. president obama says the united states will give up control of the operation soon. >> we anticipate this transition to take place in a matter of days and not a matter of weeks. >> the only favorable strategic outcome is ghadafi gone and some form of stability re- established in a country that right now is facing a protracted civil war. >> the coalition forces are planning to expand the no-fly zone over libya. >>> an update now on the disaster in japan. members of the nuclear regulatory commission met yesterday at its headquarters in rockville. they say the situation at a damaged nuclear plant in japan appears to be stabilizing. officials are working to restore power to the cooling systems but that could steak a few more weeks because of the extensive damage caused by the deadly 9.0 earthquake and tsunami. more than 450,000 people have been displaced from that and the death toll could top 18,000. a virginia woman's body has been found in the rub all of a building in japan too. 4-year-old taylor anderson was killed during the earthquake and tsun
into their cause. that is half of their active force. the united states involved in a big way, as well. the u.s.a. ronald -- u.s.s. ronald reagan and 20 rescue missions were run and choppers from there. six were in operation, rescue operations. you name it. at the end, it all comes to down to the japanese people. again in small coastal town we watched you might see a boat behind me. there were boats, there were trucks, there were cars lining the streets upside-down swept by the tsunami which had hit here on friday. most of those were taken away by the end of the day, very determined people, indeed. >> gregg: earthquake in japan hitting very close to home. many japanese-americans trying to get in touch with their loved ones. one community on the west coast springing into action to help victims. casey stegall is live in little tokyo section of los angeles. >> reporter: a lot of people don't know this but 300,000 japanese-americans call the state of california home. that is the largest population in all of the united states. little tokyo, a neighborhood back here behind me in downtown los angeles,
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